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Nokia 3310 to feature a coloured screen, slimmer design: Report

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Nokia, Nokia 3310, Nokia 3310, MWC 2017, HMD Global, Nokia 3310 launch, Nokia 3310 design, Nokia 3310 colours, Nokia 3310 price, Nokia 3310 features, Nokia 3310 specifications, Nokia Android smartphones, smartphones, technology, technology news Nokia’s feature phone will have the same design language as the original variant, but the new Nokia 3310 will be lighter as well as slimmer.

Nokia is gearing to re-launch its classic 3310 smartphone at Mobile World Congress (2017) in Barcelona. The news has got Nokia 3310 fans all excited with anticipation what new the company has in store for them. Now, Chinese website VTech has revealed Nokia 3310 will be upgraded to feature a coloured screen, replacing the old monochrome display in the older variant. The site has put out a couple of more details about the reincarnated variant of Nokia 3310 ahead of its launch.

According to the report, Nokia’s feature phone will have the same design language as the original variant, but the new Nokia 3310 will be lighter as well as slimmer. It will come in a number of colour options such as red, green, yellow and more. Further according to the site, while physical key buttons will remain the same, their size could change in the new Nokia 3310.

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The report is in line with what we reported earlier. A source in the dealership space in Delhi told indianexpress.com that the 3310 could be available in India as early as May. The source, who has happened to see Nokia 3310 before its unveiling in Barcelona, said the device was “mind blowing and very beautiful”. He said the basic phone will look different from the original version. “They have changed the design completely; it’s oval shaped now”. The new Nokia 3310 will arrive in multiple colours.

As for the price, the new Nokia 3301 could cost around $44 (Rs 3,000 approx). Nokia 3301 is expected to have a huge recall value in India, given its popularity in the feature phones segment. Nokia 3310 was widely popular for its classic ‘Snake’game, a long-lasting battery and durability. We’ve all seen Nokia 3310 memes highlighting its ‘durability’ being widely circulated on social media. Nokia 3310 will most likely dominate the feature phones segment when it launches here.

Read: Exclusive: HMD Global could bring Nokia 3310 to India by May, more phones coming

Other than the 3310, HMD Global –  the Finnish company that owns the rights to use Nokia’s brand on smartphones and tablets —  is expected to launch a slew of new Android smartphones at the MWC. The list of devices include Nokia 3, Nokia 5 and Nokia 8. Nokia made a comeback in the smartphone industry with its Nokia 6 smartphone, which is currently exclusive to China. However, the mid-range smartphone could soon make its way to India at about Rs 19,000.

Nokia’s Surprising Smartphone Strategy

Posted by on 7:12 am in Mobility Strategy | Comments Off

What’s Finnish for “when they go high, we go low?”

As the world’s geekerati descend on Barcelona for Mobile World Congress 2017, there is an excitement in the digital air. The Nokia name is back. Europe’s former smartphone juggernaut has resurfaced, promising new handsets, the return of a familiar name and some serious competition for Apple, Samsung, and the rest of the Android ecosystem.

Just don’t expect the big story to be the killer high-end smartphone that does everything you could possibly dream off. That’s not how Finland’s smartphones work in 2017.

Nokia 6 (image: HMD Global PR)

Strictly speaking HMD Global is still a Finnish start-up that is less than one year old. Its public launch in late 2016 followed a complicated story of naming rights, patents and product lines drawn from Nokia, Microsoft, and Foxconn. Broadly speaking HMD licences the Nokia name and various IP rights from the Finnish legend, acquired the Nokia branded manufacturing business from Microsoft and signed agreements with Foxconn subsidiary FIH to manufacture mobile hardware.

As CES 2017 drew to a close, HMD announced the Nokia 6. Initially available in China, this mid-range Android powered handset achieved sold-out status when it was put on sale, and since then all signs are that stock is selling out as fast as it can hit the retail shelves.

It’s likely that a western version of the Nokia 6 will be one of HMD’s Nokia devices announced at MWC. If you’re following the online chatter you might be expecting a higher specification device. Sometimes referred to as the P1, other times as the Nokia 8, maxing out the specifications to deliver a high-end flagship would be a strong statement that Nokia has returned and can challenge the likes of Apple straight out of the gate.

The high-end device may be on show, or it may be held back until later in the year when HMD has a better understanding of the modern mobile market. Right now HMD has historical and theoretical knowledge from the industry veterans on its staff, but it does not have a huge amount of practical experience with handsets that are closing in on a $1000 price tag.

But it has a secret weapon to leverage – the Nokia feature phone business.

HMD Global has inherited a significant proportion of this market. It is number one or number two in every feature phone market around the world, and approaches ninety-four percent share in some markets.  While this is a diminishing market in the mid- to long-term it is providing not only an immediate source of revenue but also fostering a loyal and fanatical customer base looking for value-for-money handsets to suit their lifestyles.

They don’t want a $1000 smartphone. They want a $100 smartphone that does the job, from a brand they trust, that is fashionable and desirable. This is where HMD can make its new business a success. The Nokia 6 has set the tone, now it’s time for a handset that is even more accessible… Nokia always loved a simple numbering scheme, so let’s halve what is already working and go for the Nokia 3 as the story of MWC.

And if those customers aren’t quite ready for a smartphone, the reimagining of the indestructible everlasting Nokia 3310 is going to build brand loyalty and keep these consumers and their cash within the HMD family until they are ready to try Android.

HMD Global’s CEO Arto Nummela (image: hmdglobal.com)

Starting up a new mobile phone business is hard. HMD has a number of advantages that have guaranteed it attention from the industry – such as an initial revenue stream and a hunger from consumers to see what it can deliver – but it is still a young company with limited resources fighting against some of the biggest names in the industry with huge bankrolls.

This is not the time to go all-in with a specification-busting top-of-the-line smartphone that tries to match the likes of the iPhone, the Galaxy S8 family, or any of the ambitious handsets that are going to be on display in Barcelona. HMD’s 2017 success will not lie with the geekerati who play specifications Top Trumps.

By all means watch Sunday’s MWC presentation for the dreams, the future plans and the revolutionary aspects that HMD will be aspiring to. Pay attention to the Android powered handset that will be sitting on the bottom rung of the portfolio.

That’s where you’ll find success.

Now read how HMD want to bring Finland’s smartphone dreams back to the market…

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Adobe Comp CC makes mobile design simple and easy (Review)

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Overview:

Adobe Comp CC is an editing and drafting program for exporting into other Adobe suite programs for easy, on the go project managing.

Developer: Adobe

Cost: Free

Impressions:

Adobe software is often used by professionals for graphic design and other media creation professions to great effect. Adobe has added most of their most popular software to the Play Store as mobile-optimized applications for on-the-go productivity. The newest member of the Adobe mobile suite is Comp CC, an all new app that eases the editing load on the go.

Comp CC is, essentially, a wire-frame and concept creation tool for exporting into other Adobe software for refinement. It has preconfigured templates for web, paper, and mobile layouts that you can edit and export to InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator as well as Adobe’s cloud where you can pull it down to any machine you wish.

Compared to the offerings of other Adobe software, Comp CC is rather limited. You can choose a template or create your own, import images, add text and graphics, and do some minor manipulation of color and such. From there, you can export it or share it to your email or social media. That is pretty much all it does.

The idea behind Comp appears to be that it’s something to get you started on a project, lay out a plan while on the go without having to use draft paper or lose progress by starting over on your main editing machine. It’s almost like a draft program but lets you get real progress on what would eventually become a more complex design for a web page, magazine, business card or what have you.

In terms of the app itself, it works really well but I would recommend using a larger screen device like a tablet, I used it primarily on my Samsung Chromebook Plus which has a touch screen and stylus making it a dream to use. The experience on the phone felt rather cramped and it’s not the most ideal place unless you don’t have another choice. The user interface is clean and minimal, with only a few options available. It’s easy to use and straightforward, without being confusing at all which is a big plus.

Some negative points now, but they’re minor. The app seems rather pointless without at least one or two other adobe apps to compliment it, so it’ll be a hard sell for the average user who doesn’t do any graphic design or use Adobe at all. Also, the templates for Comp CC aren’t all that helpful, as they’re just blank pages sized and oriented to the selected format. I would have liked to see some more helpful guidelines or page layout tools to help you make your own pages faster, especially if you’re a novice like me.

Conclusion:

I really like Comp CC more than I thought I would. It does exactly what it sets out to do, and is a handy tool to draft projects on the go for the busy graphic designer or other professional. It’s clean and simple and even novices can get some use out of it. I’d recommend it for anyone who uses Adobe software regularly, or someone looking for a simple editing app for basic manipulation.

Download Adobe Comp CC on the Google Play Store

Appboy Partners with PlaceIQ to Drive Results for Urban Outfitter’s …

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“PlaceIQ continues to help innovative brands succeed by delivering best-in-class location data, in order to grant a better understanding of the consumer journey,” said Duncan McCall, CEO and co-founder at PlaceIQ. “Location-aware insights have become a great enabler of decisions across media, marketing and business functions, as well as a core component in driving benefits like significant visitation lift and purchases at brick and mortar locations. Insights from location data can also be a powerful driver for online retail sales as well. By using location data for audience insights, Urban Outfitters was able to craft and deliver a resonant campaign that resulted in tangible sales results. We are excited to continue our partnership with AppBoy to help brands connect with customers in meaningful ways.”

Mobile devices continue to proliferate and act as a connection between the physical and digital world, allowing for better personalization and more actionable messaging. The rise of mobile has made it easier to deliver campaigns to customers based on in-app and web preferences allowing marketers to better understand and engage users. By partnering with Appboy and PlaceIQ, Urban Outfitters was able to develop a full scale campaign that included:

  • Dynamic audience filters. To further target their outreach, Urban Outfitters used PlaceIQ’s support for dynamic audience filters—based on real-world location information and other Appboy data—to deliver messages based on visitation and behavior outside the app. For example, using push notifications to promote party dresses exclusively to female audiences who frequent bars and nightlife locations.
  • Emoji messaging. In order to make their messaging more eye-catching and engaging to the demographics targeted by the campaign, Urban Outfitters included emojis in their push notifications, to heighten the fun, light-hearted tone. Appboy recently found that open rates for iOS and Android push notifications containing emojis have increased by 210% and 1,063%, respectively, year over year.
  • Deep linking. To provide users with a smoother experience and increase the chances that messaging led to conversions, Urban Outfitters took advantage of Appboy’s support for mobile deep linking to send users right to the relevant page within the app when they tapped the message.
  • Conversion events. To ensure accurate monitoring of the impact of promotional campaigns, Urban Outfitters used Appboy’s Conversion Events feature to track when the push notifications sent as part of this outreach resulted in a purchase.
  • Message testing. Appboy’s message testing capabilities were used to evaluate separate versions of the campaign—one sent to the targeted PlaceIQ Audience, and one sent to female users who had previously expressed interest in dresses.

“One of the base premises of Appboy is that you can have better relationships with your customers if you have better conversations with them,” said Bill Magnuson, CEO and Co-Founder of Appboy. “One-size-fits-all approaches don’t work when you’re trying to enrich relationships. If someone interrupts your day to send a marketing message, it needs to deliver value. An impersonal push notification is like a telemarketer calling during dinner. No one likes it. With the Appboy/PlaceIQ integration, our clients gain access to a detailed understanding of locations and customer activity to avoid these marketing faux pas—making the outreach more connected to the customer and giving the brand more respect.”

About Appboy  
Appboy is the leading lifecycle engagement platform for marketing, growth, and engagement teams. We exist to help marketers seize the opportunities created by the challenges of today’s mobile economy. That means we built the world’s best intelligent CRM so marketers can connect human-to-human, at scale, with their customers, driving deep engagement and ROI. The center of our platform is the holistic user profile that offers a single view of the customer. Our robust audience segmentation and advanced multichannel messaging allow brands to use the data from these user profiles to create and automate highly personalized marketing campaigns, and build meaningful dialogues with their audiences across devices and channels. Thousands of global marketers use Appboy to connect with nearly 700 million monthly active users, with 10 billion messages processed through our platform each month. We help brands like Domino’s, ABC News, Capital One, Opera, SoundCloud, and Urban Outfitters to better engage, retain, and monetize their customers. Appboy is venture backed with over 140 employees and offices in New York, San Francisco, and London. Learn more at Appboy.com.

About PlaceIQ  
For brands seeking to understand consumer behavior, PlaceIQ connects physical and digital activities across time, space and mobile devices to uncover opportunities to learn and connect with audiences. PlaceIQ is a powerful, location-based audience and insights platform that organizes a wide variety of consumer activity data around a targeted precise location base map at massive scale. PlaceIQ uses its detailed understanding of location and consumer activity to reach a targeted audience, and also to derive powerful insights about consumer behavior to inform market and business strategies for national brands. The company is headquartered in New York City and has offices in Palo Alto, Chicago and Detroit. Follow us on Twitter @PlaceIQ and like us on Facebook: PlaceIQ.

About Urban Outfitters, Inc.  
Urban Outfitters, Inc. is an innovative specialty retail company which offers a variety of lifestyle merchandise to highly defined customer niches through 240 Urban Outfitters stores in the United States, Canada, and Europe, catalogs and websites; 218 Anthropologie Group stores in the United States, Canada and Europe, catalogs and websites; 114 Free People stores in the United States and Canada, catalogs and websites; and Free People wholesale, which sells its product to approximately 1,800 specialty stores and select department stores worldwide, as of January 31, 2016.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/appboy-partners-with-placeiq-to-drive-results-for-urban-outfitters-mobile-strategy-300411619.html

SOURCE PlaceIQ

Related Links

http://www.placeiq.com

Local Language / Global Network: Designing Mobile Technology for Indigenous and Minority Language Users

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The photo by Derek Lackaff taken in rural County Galway, Ireland in January 2016

A version of this post was originally published at r12n on Medium.

Last summer, an Irish woman named Caoimhe Ní Chathail sent her mobile phone company a tweet to let them know that she was having some trouble using their website. For months, the site had been rejecting her name as “invalid” because it contained an accented Irish letter (í). The mobile company’s response was to ask if Caoimhe could just use the “English version” of her name. This very public exchange caused a minor uproar on Irish Twitter: an Irish company seemed to be questioning the acceptability of using the Irish language online in Ireland. Within a few weeks, the company had actually updated its site so it would not reject Irish names, but this small incident illustrates the type of interactions that speakers of Irish frequently face in their interactions with digital media.

Irish (Gaeilge) is the first official language of Ireland, a recognized minority language in Northern Ireland, and an official language of the European Union. Instruction in the language is mandated throughout primary and secondary school. The language has a rich literary heritage, and is used in radio, television, and across the internet. Second language learners outside Ireland can find formal opportunities to study the language at universities like Notre Dame or University of Sydney, or more casually at a MeetUp or using free apps like Duolingo. Despite this support and interest, Irish is considered to be “definitely endangered.” Current estimates suggest that there are only about 40-70,000 daily speakers out of the Irish population of 4.6 million. Irish is a community language spoken outside of school in very few areas, most prominently in specially-designated rural regions called Gaeltachtai. Irish is thus a minority language in Ireland where most people use the majority language — English — in their daily life.

Percentage of people who speak Irish daily outside the education system, 2011 Census. By SkateTier CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

A recent report suggests that Irish could actually die out as a community language within a decade or two. This puts Irish in the company of thousands of other human languages that could disappear in the coming years and decades without active intervention. While the technical classification of languages and their endangerment levels is somewhat contested, the global trend is toward less linguistic diversity as languages like English, Spanish, or Chinese displace local and indigenous languages. Although languages have come and gone throughout human history, colonialism, assimilation programs, and globalization have put massive pressures on languages of fewer speakers over the past century. In the United States over 150 indigenous languages still have living speakers, but decades of cultural suppression have left these languages in a very precarious position. There are still 2,000 speakers of Lakota, for example, but most first-language Lakota speakers are now in their 60s and 70s. Intergenerational transmission of a language — grandparents and parents to children — is the core process in a language’s survival, so language preservation and revitalization is often a race against time.

There are many reasons why users should be empowered to use their own language, and for preserving linguistic diversity. A language represents an unbroken connection to a particular culture and perspective, and encodes unique information about humans and the world. Access to a heritage language provides profound benefits to peoples who are resisting and recovering from colonialism. With my colleague William J. Moner, I recently started a research project that examines the use of a minority language — Irish — across mobile media. We suggest that lessons from the Irish experience might be applied to the other thousands of endangered human languages, and that interaction designers have an important role to play in the language revitalization process.

Minority Language Computerization

Communication technologies, and social media more specifically, present both opportunities and challenges for minority language preservation and revitalization efforts. Benefits include the ability to widely distribute cultural and news media, as well as learning materials; and the opportunity to improve the prestige of the language, and promote its use among younger generations. This last point becomes increasingly salient as global youth cultures move towards always-connected communication contexts exemplified by mobile messaging platforms like Snapchat, Facebook Messenger, and WhatsApp.

Digital communication platforms potentially enable members of language communities to remain in contact with one another whether they are local or distant. However, as the personal computer loses primacy to mobile communication devices, interaction and input rely more on advanced processes like speech recognition and gesture typing than on traditional keyboard typing. While accepting basic textual input from a keyboard is a trivial computational exercise, providing more advanced functionality such as spelling correction or speech processing is more expensive in terms of time and resources. Some observers have started sounding alarms, such the poet and musician Sjón regarding his native Icelandic language (330,000 speakers):

The broader and more serious implications are for the language as it is used in daily life. Technology is moving towards AI and speech-controlled applications, and the companies developing it do not see preserving languages spoken by few as their responsibility. When the day comes that we have to speak to our refrigerators in English (which I believe is not far in the future), Icelandic will retreat very fast.

And Icelandic isn’t even technically endangered.

The computerization of minority languages provides several new opportunities for language preservation and revitalization. These opportunities include easier and less intrusive language documentation, for example by using mobile apps like Aikuma. They include new opportunities for pedagogy and learning, as new text, audio, video, and computer-assisted learning software becomes easier to produce and disseminate. Among my favorite examples are the game Never Alone, which was developed in close collaboration with Alaska Native storytellers.

Another fun example is the Lakota-dubbed version of Berenstain Bears now available on Youtube. Finally, software localization or translation, particularly of open-source software, is an area of particular promise for minority languages. Kevin Scannell, a computer scientist at Saint Louis University, lists many software applications — including desktop apps like Mozilla Firefox and LibreOffice, and webapps like Gmail and Twitter — that are now available in Irish thanks to his and others’ contributions.

Mobile eats the world

Globally there has been a massive shift towards mobile, and it’s clear mobile devices shape the use of a language in different ways than personal computers do. The first generation of mobile text platforms was primarily composed of mobile phones with small screens and numeric input pads. Because the standard numeric keypad only had 12 buttons, most characters were entered using multiple button presses to cycle through available options. For example, a user would press the button labeled “2” six times to produce the Á character, first cycling through the characters A, B, C, 2, and Ä. Predictive text is an input technology designed to ameliorate some of these problems, allowing the software to “predict” which word a user intended to produce based on a reduced number of button taps. Predictive text increases text input speed by as much as 30%, and was broadly implemented for global languages, but support for minority languages with smaller commercial markets languished.

Sure beats button mashing on a feature phone.

Touchscreen devices such as the Apple iPhone and iPad characterize the second generation of mobile platforms. Such devices typically employ a “soft keyboard” that appears onscreen when text entry is necessary. For a minority language with a script closely related to a majority language, basic input of text is likely not a problem. Modern Irish, for example, uses the majority of letters from the Latin alphabet with five accented vowel characters (síneadh fada) that can be accessed from an English keyboard with just an extra key tap. Typing characters one at a time, however, is probably a foreign concept to most touchscreen device users. For users of global languages, software keyboards provide advanced features such as gesture typing, spellchecking, and automatic corrections. These types of interface technologies greatly increase the convenience, accuracy, and speed of text input on mobile devices, and this may introduces a bias toward the majority language even for fluent minority language users.

How does Irish go mobile?

To better understand how minority language users interact with mobile technologies, we developed and conducted an online survey of young Irish speakers and learners in Ireland. The survey was derived from one used in a previous study of teenage speakers of Frisian, a minority language spoken in the Netherlands. As might be expected, these participants tended to be very heavy users of social media, particularly of mobile social media apps. They reported divergent levels of language proficiency: understanding of Irish was fairly high, speaking proficient was a bit lower, and writing was significantly lower.

These users had a lot to say about their experience using Irish in social and mobile media, and the various obstacles they faced, and three broad themes emerged from their responses to open-ended questions. The first theme was that the audience for Irish was much smaller than the audience for English. Most of the participants have many friends who speak Irish, but many hesitated to use the language socially in digital media. In fact, many suggested that it would be “unusual” or “abnormal” to see Irish in their feeds. No users reported that they attempt to segment their audience by language, for example by using Facebook lists.

The second, related theme was that users note their networks are linguistically pluralistic, and they were concerned that posting in Irish would exclude or offend those who didn’t speak the language. This finding was in many ways paradoxical, as participants also generally feel that the language is an important part of their culture and personal identity.

The third theme was that the mobile media context presents specific technical challenges. Even fluent users are faced with additional challenges in producing written Irish on a mobile device — rather than using advanced gesture typing with autocorrect, they are forced to laboriously input text letter by letter. In many cases, the keyboard actively works against them, as the English autocorrect marks all their Irish as misspelled, or “corrects” their Irish words into English. The challenge of producing “correct” Irish on a mobile keyboard is exacerbated for many potential Irish users who are not completely fluent. Several mentioned that they had been publicly critiqued or shamed by “grammar snobs” or prescriptivists for writing “incorrect” Irish online.

These findings suggest some specific issues that interaction designers might consider in designing for minority language users.

Technological factors

Most of our respondents find that current mobile interfaces inhibit the use of Irish. Whether it is accessing accented characters or battling the autocorrect in another language, the interface itself can push users toward the majority language. In some smaller language communities, users have no problem with switching keyboard layouts, disabling assistive technologies like gesture typing and autocorrect, and typing words out a letter at a time. However, in a minority language context such as the Irish example, users make the valid assumption that everyone in their network is proficient in English, and thus elect to take the path of least linguistic and technical resistance. Many of the fluent Irish users in our sample send English messages to their Irish speaking friends and family, even if they speak Irish with them in person and on the phone.

We also find that social media popularity metrics push Irish users towards using the majority language. Such metrics tend to be simplistic but are prominently featured on every post or update: think “likes” or “comment counts” or “retweets.” In the attention economy in which social media users are encouraged to perform, anything that might limit engagement — like the use of a minority language — will be avoided.

Cultural contexts

Second, all minority language users live and communicate in a complex cultural context. Irish has a deep and complex set of associations for Irish people, ranging from a sense of heritage and pride, to concerns about political conflict or painful experiences learning the language in school. Further, it is safe for Irish users to assume that English will be understood by their entire local network, while Irish will only be understood by some of their Irish network and none of their global network. This complicates the sustained use of Irish, particularly for younger generations. If the goal is to encourage casual, creative use of the language, there may be value in designing to promote new language norms, for example with monolingual platforms that remove the social ambiguity of bilingualism. Other minority languages will have different relationships with the majority language, warranting other types of designs.

Linguistic requirements

Finally, languages have specific and unique linguistic requirements related to their orthography, morphology, and computational resources. Irish is somewhat unique as a minority language in that it is comparatively well-resourced. For example, several inexpensive or free functional Irish keyboard input technologies are already available for mobile devices, but adoption seems to be low among the potential userbase we surveyed. None of our participants mentioned using the Adaptxt keyboard, a free iOS and Android keyboard that provides high-quality Irish predictive and autocorrect functionality and easy language switching. A few users noted that they used the Swype keyboard, which is a separate download, but has full support for Irish. There are active centers of research in Irish computational linguistics, such as the ADAPT Centre collaborative in Dublin. Kevin Scannell suggests that for Irish, the challenge is not a dearth of technical resources or support, but actually connecting users with these resources: effectively marketing Irish-language software and interfaces to potential users, and convincing operating system developers and device manufacturers to integrate Irish language technologies into their products. There are indications that this may be happening for some languages — the latest version of Google’s GBoard keyboard app for iOS and Android supports Irish, and allows for autocorrect and prediction in multiple languages simultaneously.

Teresa Lynn, a researcher with the ADAPT Centre, gives a TEDx talk on Irish and social media.

Language vitality requires practice in spaces where people are active in a mutual exchange of ideas and where conversation may occur. As global technology giants like Facebook and Google, for example, move aggressively into developing regions of the world, questions of linguistic self-determination and colonial resistance are becoming increasingly important. Encouraging the everyday use of endangered languages –in both offline and online contexts — warrants a strong push for participation and engagement by minority language activists, designers, and developers in these spaces.

As communication technologies move into increasingly intimate and developing cultural contexts, and as social media platforms facilitate communication within these contexts, the tensions between local languages and the global technologies will continue to vex both local communities and interaction designers. While Irish is a unique minority language, its examination provides insights into how global and local practices are mediated through mobile interfaces.

LG: We made mistakes in India mobile strategy: LG – Times of India

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New Delhi: The head of LG in India has said that the company “made mistakes” in its mobile phone product strategy which has been the reason behind its poor performance in the fast-growing segment.

The company, which has a low single-digit market share, is now banking on locally-developed models to turn around its devices business as it re-focuses on the category that contributes less than Rs 1,000 crore to the annual revenue of Rs 22,000 crore.

“We made mistakes earlier… our products are not attractive enough for Indian customers as yet,” Kim Ki Wan, MD of LG India, told TOI here. The performance of the top Korean electronics giant in the Indian mobile phone market is in stark contrast to traditional rival and compatriot Samsung that commands a strong grip on the category. And adding to the worries of LG is the growing dominance of Chinese companies such as Huawei, Vivo, Oppo and Gionee.

Wan said that the Chinese companies had been gaining share on the back of massive price subsidies and heavy marketing spends, something “not sustainable” in the long-term. “When the cost (of manufacturing a phone) is similar, the price gap (between products) cannot be big… I don’t understand how long they can last with this aggressive marketing investment.”

The company, however, has been a laggard in the phone business, despite a strong presence in the consumer electronics and home appliances categories. Several attempts at giving a push to the phone business, which has earned rich dividends to relatively-new and homegrown brands such as Micromax, Karbonn and Lava, have failed. Wan has accorded “top priority” to the revival of phone operations, especially as India has moved rapidly to become the top market in the world, behind only China. “We are focused on developing India-specific designs and functions to make a differentiation when compared to our competitors.”

The company is now launching locally-researched models that it is sourcing from a factory run by contract manufacturer Wistron. “India is huge and diverse, and we have studied this market over the last few years. Now step-by-step, we are coming up with new devices with specific local functions.”

A new device, K10, was launched by the company for Rs 14,000 and this has a ‘panic button’, in line with the government’s views on having an enhanced safety apparatus on devices. Speaking about the consumer electronics market, Wan said that there are uncertainties due to certain global factors. The protectionist voice from the Trump administration in the US has also impacted the sentiments among buyers.

Picking Your Mobile Solution: Should You Build A Native App Or Stick With Responsive Web Design?

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It’s the new dilemma facing companies looking to beef up their mobile presence: To build a native app or stick with responsive web design. I’ve stopped counting the number of times I’ve been asked this question in the decade I’ve been running a mobile and web development studio.

While the question is always the same, my answer varies depending on each company’s needs and business focus. Each solution has its own pluses and minuses, though I categorically recommend that everyone steer clear of cross-platform frameworks, at least for now. (React Native, the newest and the most promising way to build cross-platform apps, is still in its infancy. This might be an interesting option for the business community in the future, but the technology is just not there yet for me.)

When deciding on the best mobile strategy for your company, it’s important to take several factors into consideration, including cost, speed to market, and how portable it is across platforms. Most importantly, though, never lose sight of your users. The goal is to give them the best mobile experience out there. So let’s take a closer look at the advantages and disadvantages of responsive websites and native apps.

Responsive Websites

Responsive web products — essentially mobile-device-friendly web products — are the easiest, most cost-efficient and fastest to build. There are many libraries that can help the development process move more efficiently, and a lot of engineers can work on the project at the same time. Make one change, and it can be instantly seen on all platforms. The UI is simple and user acquisitions are cheaper than with mobile apps.

On the other hand, overall performance can be slow, especially with animations and videos. You also won’t be able to insert push notifications, which are great tools for alerting users about new messages and offers.

This is a solution that will work for every company but is best suited for content-heavy projects. We’ve worked on a number of responsive web projects over the last several years, and they seem to work best for content-heavy companies like estate investment platforms. (In other words, websites with lots of long paragraphs and no defined borders.) Consider responsive web your default option. It allows you to update and change your content immediately, unlike native apps, which require you to release an update to the app store that must then be downloaded by your user base.

If your user base does not require your services be available in just one tap, then there is no real reason to consider a native app, which is more expensive and takes longer to develop. To take the above example, it’s highly unlikely that you would be making complex real estate investment decisions on the phone while riding the subway to work, so responsive web would be ideal here. On the other hand, if you want to grab a ride home after a long night of club-hopping, then you’d likely want to be able to order an Uber as easily as possible. In that case, a native app is the better choice.

We made mistakes in India mobile strategy: LG

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New Delhi: The head of LG in India has said that the company “made mistakes” in its mobile phone product strategy which has been the reason behind its poor performance in the fast-growing segment.

The company, which has a low single-digit market share, is now banking on locally-developed models to turn around its devices business as it re-focuses on the category that contributes less than Rs 1,000 crore to the annual revenue of Rs 22,000 crore.

“We made mistakes earlier… our products are not attractive enough for Indian customers as yet,” Kim Ki Wan, MD of LG India, told TOI here. The performance of the top Korean electronics giant in the Indian mobile phone market is in stark contrast to traditional rival and compatriot Samsung that commands a strong grip on the category. And adding to the worries of LG is the growing dominance of Chinese companies such as Huawei, Vivo, Oppo and Gionee.

Wan said that the Chinese companies had been gaining share on the back of massive price subsidies and heavy marketing spends, something “not sustainable” in the long-term. “When the cost (of manufacturing a phone) is similar, the price gap (between products) cannot be big… I don’t understand how long they can last with this aggressive marketing investment.”

The company, however, has been a laggard in the phone business, despite a strong presence in the consumer electronics and home appliances categories. Several attempts at giving a push to the phone business, which has earned rich dividends to relatively-new and homegrown brands such as Micromax, Karbonn and Lava, have failed. Wan has accorded “top priority” to the revival of phone operations, especially as India has moved rapidly to become the top market in the world, behind only China. “We are focused on developing India-specific designs and functions to make a differentiation when compared to our competitors.”

The company is now launching locally-researched models that it is sourcing from a factory run by contract manufacturer Wistron. “India is huge and diverse, and we have studied this market over the last few years. Now step-by-step, we are coming up with new devices with specific local functions.”

A new device, K10, was launched by the company for Rs 14,000 and this has a ‘panic button’, in line with the government’s views on having an enhanced safety apparatus on devices. Speaking about the consumer electronics market, Wan said that there are uncertainties due to certain global factors. The protectionist voice from the Trump administration in the US has also impacted the sentiments among buyers.

Mobile Technik Announced As UK Promocube Distributor

Posted by on 2:44 am in Mobile Design | Comments Off

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Mobile Technik, specialists in event trailers and pop-up structures, is announcing its appointment as the sole UK distributor of innovative German mobile event space Promocube.

The Promocube is a versatile mobile event space that heralds a dramatic new design, opening up to create an innovative 36m² pop-up environment. From high-end VIP hospitality suites, experiential brand zones, TV studios and broadcast hubs to pop-up retail units for UK touring roadshows, this new temporary event space helps to create unforgettable environments to meet a range of budgets and creative briefs.

The Promocube is designed for both indoor and outdoor use with an open structure for an airy feel, or with easy-to-assemble Plexiglass panels providing a weather resistant, temperature controlled, enclosed environment. This space is fully customisable to suit any requirement from wrapping the whole structure with branding to installing internal screen displays and event furniture.

Manufactured in Germany, each structure is transported on a flat bed trailer and simply installed on site by hydraulics lifting the Promocube off the trailer and easily into place.

Each structure is fully equipped with LED roof downlights and multiple power points. The floor is constructed with hard-wearing non-slip aluminium ripple plates and this can be customised with PVC, carpets, artificial grass or laminate coverings.

Three different models are available, the ‘UrbanLegend’ offering an event space up to 24m², the ‘BigSquare’ and the ‘LongTail’ with different configurations but both offering up to 36m² event space. These models can all be enhanced with additional enlarged presentation areas.

Mobile Technik’s Billy Smart comments “This is a revolutionary new product to the UK events market as a temporary structure with the look and feel of a sleek permanent building. The team were impressed with how quick and easy the Promocube is to install, and saw it filling a niche in the current market, taking temporary event structures to a new dimension.”

“As we offer a field-tested and successful premium-product, we were looking for a powerful and efficient partner for distribution and handling of our modules. We are sure that Mobile Technik with their experience in temporary structures and logistics, as well as with their diversified customer portfolio and network is the perfect partner for us in the UK” says Stephan Weide, managing director of Promocube GmbH.

Mobile Technik will be launching their Promocube involvement at Europe’s leading retail trade fair, EuroShop 5-9 March exhibiting in Hall 4, Stand FO6.


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Intel CEO Brian Krzanich Touts 5G Wireless Strategy Ahead of MWC …

Posted by on 2:44 am in Mobility Strategy | Comments Off

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich is tired of hearing how his company missed the mobile revolution, at least for the first wave of smartphones and the 3G and early 4G wireless networks that they relied on. After analyzing what went wrong, he’s more focused on Intel cashing in on the next wave of even speedier wireless technology: 5G.

With the entire mobile and telecommunications industry coming together next week for their annual conference, the Mobile World Congress, all manner of 5G products will be on display. Intel, too will be unveiling its latest mobile gear for the expected next step in wireless. But it’s not just the products, it’s the way Intel has gone about developing and testing them that could improve the chipmaker’s prospects, the CEO says.

The lesson of Intel’s earlier failed mobile efforts was all about hubris and going it alone. Smartphone and tablet makers largely ignored Intel’s proprietary chips, relying instead on designs from ARM Holdings that were widely licensed and improved upon by different companies. And as Intel missed the new mobile market, now selling 1.5 billion devices a year, sales of its core PC chip market started to tank because smartphone-wielding consumers saw less need to upgrade their home computers.

On 5G, by contrast, Intel has been heavily engaged with government agencies, industry associations and other leading companies in communications gear such as Nokia, Ericsson (ericsson) and Huawei to help set the technical standards for how the new wireless technology will operate. Intel has also partnered early on for trials and tests with the big mobile carriers like Verizon (vz), ATT (t), and China Mobile that will be on the front lines of deploying some of the first 5G capable networks.

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“We’ve gone with partnerships this time rather than go a lone way, which we did on 4G,” Krzanich tells Fortune in an exclusive interview ahead of the big industry gathering in Barcelona. “So we’ve done 5G much differently by engaging with the industry and really becoming a partner with the industry.”

The key question is whether Intel’s expertise and dominant position in making computer chips, used in everything from consumer laptops to giant corporate data centers, will provide much of an edge in the evolving 5G marketplace. One problem with the company’s earlier mobile efforts was a lack of appreciation for the different priorities of a smartphone from computers, such as the greater need to conserve power because of the device’s small battery and need to stay on all day without recharging.

But 5G networks will not only operate at far faster download and upload speeds than today’s 4G networks, they will also be asked to carry many times more data from all kinds of new Internet-connected devices like self-driving cars and drones. Autonomous vehicles, for example, will collect vast amounts of sensor data about conditions, traffic, and their surroundings while needing to connect with high-definition mapping data and other content.

At last month’s CES show, Intel unveiled a 5G modem chip that can transmit both in the high-frequency 28GHz band being tested for 5G in the United States and Korea as well as lower bands, like 3.3GHz, being tried in Europe and China. Intel said it will have samples of the modem chip—which can download at 10 to 20 times the speed of current 4G LTE modems—available for testing by manufacturers in the second half of the year.

Intel’s overarching 5G strategy will be to provide a full suite of products for covering almost every part of the new networks that will all seamlessly interact, Krzanich explains. In his vision, the company’s 5G modem chip for cars will connect with other high capacity Intel computing chips and sensors in the vehicle and then send data back to data centers that, of course, also run on Intel chips. The same will be true for robotics, drones, and home broadband, he says. And 5G networks will have to be designed to be more flexible, relying on software that can be reprogramming to handle many different tasks running on more generic hardware, instead of being built on more customized hardware dedicated to specific tasks.

“You’ll be able to service your customers with a single engineering product, and we believe that differentiates us from most of the rest of the competitors,” Krzanich says. Like Apple’s advantage in controlling both the iPhone’s hardware and software, that should mean that the links between different parts of the 5G network all made by Intel will be able to interact more efficiently and quickly, while Intel software gives users a smooth experience.

Speaking of competitors, chipmaker Qualcomm (qcom) is spending $47 billion to acquire NXP Semiconductors (nxpi), in large part to get more involved in the automotive market, where NXP is strong.

But Intel’s (intc) product plans are complete enough already for 5G and autonomous cars, Krzanich says, downplaying the need for any additional acquisitions. “We feel like…we’ve got the right products,” he says.

Other rivals that lack the breadth of products of Intel may need to acquire, Krzanich adds. And “as a result of that, I think consolidation in the industry will continue, but that’s an industry comment not necessarily an Intel comment,” he says. “We’re pretty comfortable with our road map.”

Not surprisingly, Intel is opposed to extending the patent licensing model Qualcomm has imposed on current smartphones into the 5G world.

For more on Krzanich’s view of the future of tech, watch:

Apple (aapl), which buys 4G modems for iPhones from both Intel and Qualcomm, sued Qualcomm last month over licensing fees it had to pay that were calculated based on the total cost of a device. Apple argues Qualcomm shouldn’t get paid more for an iPhone that happens to cost more because it has more storage, for example. The iPhone maker says royalties should be limited to a percentage of the cost of just the components relying on Qualcomm’s modem chips. But Qualcomm counters that its patented technologies add value to the entire device, well beyond simply the capabilities of the 4G modem chip.

“You should be paid for IP you provide, not the total IP in the system,” Krzanich says, taking Apple’s side without mentioning the iPhone maker by name. “When you think about an autonomous car, a modem is just one piece and there’s quite a bit of other engineering that goes on inside there.”